Interviews

James Everingham Interview

James is a multi-instrumentalist and composer hailing from Bristol. His compositions are layered, expansive and bring film and media to life. He’s part of a the new generation of composers pushing the boundaries of soundtrack and film score composition. We asked him a few questions, his answers are below. Tell us who you are and what you do? I’m James Everingham – I’m 17, a composer/musician, and currently doing my A-Levels. Which part of the world are you from and what’s so good about it? I’m from Bristol in the UK. I love the countryside but I also love the

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An Interview with Stray Theories

We had the privilege of interviewing “Micah. A Musician/Composer. I release most of my music under the name ‘Stray Theories’.” Here’s what else he had to say.

Tell is who you are in 140 characters, twitter style?

Micah. A Musician/Composer. I release most of my music under the name ‘Stray Theories’.

Which part of world are you from and what inspires you about it?

I am from Sydney, Australia, but now I live in the South Island of New Zealand, two very different places

Where I live in New Zealand is quiet, but incredibly beautiful & scenic, always inspiring. Sydney is busy and buzzing with all sorts of life & culture, both places inspire me.

What makes Micah tick?

Music & any form of art/creativity.. new experiences & places, improvisation, live music, family.. they all inspire me and keep me motivated ..

Describe yourself as an producer artist what is your style?

I love to create deep, atmospheric, melodic sounds – especially densely layered soundscapes..
Over time my style/approach has changed alot. My first love has always been more minimal ambient styles of music and in the last few years I have gone back to that. I also love darker experimental music.

Ryo Ishido Film and Trailer Score Composer

Composer spotlight with Ryo Ishido, accomplished Film and Trailer Score Composer, Listen to the music 8pm & 2am.

In Conversation With Owsey

Owsey is the producer of fine electronic Ambient Post Dubstep whatever music, if you haven’t heard it yet why not? There’s a download of his stuff right here. He was kind enough to respond when I asked him a few questions about himself and the results, well you decide. Press play and read on.

Tell is who you are in 140 characters, twitter style?

Owen, Owsey, music maker, human.

Which part of world are you from and what’s the best thing about it?

I’m from Northern Ireland. It’s renowned for its scenic offerings more than anything, but I love it for much more than just that.

Describe yourself as an artist what is your style?

I’ve no term/genre to summarise. It gets called ambient pop, chill wave, post dubstep etc., etc. But I’ve been making a handful of various styles for the past 6 months. I work a lot with photography, putting two & two together, music & imagery. It would be nice if people would refer back to the pictures when they hear my tunes, but it’s in no way a necessity.

In Conversation with Soft Note

Philipp Kalchuk is the Russian Born Ambient Composer known as Soft Note. He’s doing a mix for us broadcasting on the 4th February, for now we find out a little bit more about him.

Hello! Let’s go 🙂

Tell is who you are in 140 characters, twitter style
I am 25 years old man who loves music. I wanted to be a painter but I realized that creating landscapes with sound is more interesting.

Which part of world are you from and what’s the best thing about it?
I am from Omsk, Russia. It is Siberia. We have an interesting climate, up to +40c in summer and down to -40c in winter. I love the people who live here because they are very kind for living in such severe place, many people here have such a strong spirit.

Describe yourself as a producer what is your style?
I like to create atmospheric and detailed soundscapes. At first my style was futuristic but now I am very close to the spirit, nature and the universe. I also love experimental Ambient.

What thing makes you happiest about the current music scene?
The best in the current music scene is that it is easily accessible. You can find almost anything that you want. I love digital releases simply because it is hard to find rare or limited albums on CD in our city and I prefer to pay directly to the artist and download his or her albums.

A Conversation with Valerio Matola

Valerio Matola Pianist and Composer originating from Italy, was born in a musical family and by the age of 7 wrote his first compositions. He later came to Athens and studied Classical Piano and Composition at the Greek National Conservatory.
Wrote several works for Films / Video art / Theatre and contemporary dance plays.

Valerio you composed your first song at the age of five. Are you from a musical family?

Yes, my father was a guitar player and singer and his grandmother was a well known opera singer.At the time I was born my father was working as a musician for the king of Jordan. We stayed in Amman for some years and then we moved to South Italy which is my father’s native country. When I was 8 years old we came to Greece where I am living right now.

So you took piano lessons in Greece? You have studied at the National Greek Conservatorium. That was you first encounter with classical composers?

Well actually yes. My parents did not listen too much classical music so the first time I listened Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Prokovief, Liszt to name some of the composers that have inspired me a lot was at the conservatorium. My teacher was Russian, a student of Tatiana Nikolayeva and he introduced me to Russian composers mainly. I studied with him for a couple of years and then with another teacher but soon found out that I wanted to write my own music.

That’s why you are an accomplished piano player. Your interpretations receive very good comments as well as your compositions. So tell me how is your life now?

I live in a suburb near the sea. I have a passion for nature and especially for free diving. So I have the chance to dive two to three times per week . Ideally I would like to move to an island and be able to work with my music and dive every day.

Do you find inspiration in nature? What inspires you to write music?

Yes, nature fascinates me. The colours of the sky, the changing shapes of the clouds, the mist in the air, the depth and the mystery of the sea. But a big part of my work comes also from incidents that have happened to me. From the way I look at things.

In Conversation With Chris Mac

Chris Mac has done many a mix for us over the years. with his last mix Midnight Scores getting a 1000 downloads in one day, we still know very little about the man. So I decided to ask him what’s happening.

In Conversation with Endless Melancholy

After the amazing 4 hour set he provided for us we spoke to Oleksii Sakevych to find out more about Endless Melancholy. Read the full interview inside.

1.What is Endless Melancholy?

During the first months of the project existence it was fun for me to describe Endless Melancholy using a Wikipedia quote, edited by me and semi-serious: “Endless Melancholy – (from Greek μελαγχολία – melancholia, “endless sadness”) , in contemporary usage, is an endless mood disorder of non-specific endless depression, characterized by low levels of both enthusiasm and eagerness for activity”. Later I changed it into – “Endless Melancholy is the solo-project of self-taught musician, Oleksii Sakevych, from Kiev, Ukraine, started in November 2011. Endless Melancholy was launched to express the passion and love to minimal piano and ambient music.” Basically, it says everything one needs to know about the project. It’s not meant to be neither pretentious, nor innovative. It’s just a reflection of my personality in simple instrumental tunes.

2.Which part of the world are you from and what’s so good about it?

I am from Ukraine, a country in Eastern Europe, but I never wanted my music to be tagged as Ukrainian. This definitely does not mean that I don’t love the place where I live, it’s just because music should not be limited with anything, especially geographical borders. As for Ukrainian independent music scene – there are tons of good musicians of various genres here, but only few of them have enough eagerness, dedication and luck to get recognition. I won’t list any names, maybe in a year or two you will hear all of them.

3.Where is you’re favourite place to find new music. website? magazine?

Aaaaaand, the first place goes to…. Last.fm! Seriously, I remember myself being a child and recording weekly charts of my favourite tracks and artists on pieces of paper. Who knows, maybe that’s how last.fm was born. Its creators have just put into life the ideas they have been dreaming of since their childhood. Number one website for discovering new music and promoting your own. Bandcamp.com is quite good for these purposes, too. I also like reading about albums, not only listening to them. There are myriads of great music blogs on web – A Closer Listen, The Sirens Sound, to name just a few. Sorry for not listing all of them, because it would take forever.

4.What’s an exciting or interesting thing your working on at the moment?

Well, there are a couple of them. First one is a collaborative EP with a Polish musician, recording music as Lights Dim. This is not the first experience of collaborating with people from other countries for me, but definitely the most exciting one. As I noticed, we share some common views on music, that’s why I expect this EP to be many times better than stuff I could have ever produced on my own. And working on internet, sending each other recordings via mail is interesting experience, too. The other thing I always dreamed to try is running my own label, making physical releases. You know, physical release is a kind of fetish nowadays. It is not necessary to own a CD to listen to it, you can easily download it in digital, either legally or illegally (everyone choses his own way). Buying a physical release has become a way to show your support to the musician and to what he is doing. I am among those people, who cherish sounds in physical, and especially some limited editions in original handmade packaging. That’s what I totally love, and that passion was the incentive for me to launch Hidden Vibes, my own small physical releases label. First two releases already scheduled and hopefully the debut one will see the world late December. Another work in progress is a new solo album for Endless Melancholy. Have no idea, when it will be done.

Gonzalo Blázquez – The Composer Series

Gonzalo Blázquez Gutiérrez from Spain (Madrid) composer for film and TV. Presents his music as part of the Composer Series
. Streaming now 8pm & 2AM

Aliquo Exclusive Guest Mix

The artist and producer duo Aliquo from Surrey, England, present a special guest mix that’s full of little surprises. We also managed to get a quick interview with them. Streaming Now

Rick Tedesco Progressive DJ

Any thoughts behind your track choice and placement for your mix?
“For this mix in general, I wanted to utilize deep, melodic, atmospheric and progressive breaks with a bit of a pyramid shape and form. I wanted the mix to start slow and deep and gradually move towards a more progressive and aggressive territory, then gradually wind back down.”

What inspires your best music creation moments?
“Everyday life!”

What’s the latest exciting project you’re working on?
“Trukers and I just finished a remix for the band The Panic Division, which is a rock/electronic group. The stems were super fun to play with and it was a bit different moulding a rock song into a progressive breaks track. All and all, we are really happy with the end result and the feedback has been great.”

Favourite composers, producers or DJs at the moment and why?
This is a hard one as there are so many talented artists out there… I would say BT, Trukers, Beta, Clandestine, Under This, Schodt, Geon, Abdomen Burst, Colombo and many more. As for why, well these artist all have signature styles of electronic music and to be honest, they were the first to come to mind.”

What tracks are getting the most rotation in your sets at the moment?
“When it comes to progressive breaks, I would say Trukers, Alfoa, Digital Department, Schodt, Evgeny KoTT & Abdomen Burst. When it comes to playing live and or more aggressive breaks, I would say Beta, Clandestine, Under This, Geon & Colombo”

Any words of inspiration for the people out there?
“Do what you love and love what you do!”

In Conversation with Madeleine Hanover

Maddie Hanover the Australian born composer amazed us with her compositions, entertained us with her mixtape if that’s not enough she then answered a few questions for us. Here’s the results.

Whats your name?

Madeleine Hanover

Where do you currently reside, live?

Melbourne, Australia

How long have you been composing and how did you get into it?

I’ve been writing my own music since I was small. I learnt the piano on and off throughout my childhood, but classical repertoire never interested me too much – I was much more happy listening to music that I loved and learning to play it by ear on the piano. This then translated into composition, as I wanted to be able to play the music I heard in my head all the time! I had a break from the piano for 8 or 9 years when I formally learnt the flute, but I came back to the piano and began to play more seriously and frequently. I was a bit of a movie buff when I was younger, and I loved listening to the scores. For me, scores make more sense musically and emotionally than classical music. Looking back, I think I composed in this way because I lived in my head a lot. I had so many creative ideas for music at such a fast pace that film music, which can be quite fragmented, was a perfect fit.

What inspires your best music creation moments?

When I sit down at the piano, I usually just start playing whatever comes into my head. Sometimes I’ll walk past the piano and just think I’ll quickly play something – and then I’m there for hours. Often I will go on and on repeating things or changing from one piece to the other. I’ll suddenly realise that I’m playing something new or different and have no idea how I got there!

What was the thoughts behind your track choice and placement for your playlist?

I tried to create a playlist that flowed well. I’m a huge Thomas Newman fan, so I included a lot of his work. I wanted a strong opening, and ‘Orchard House’ is a beautiful, joyous track. I wasn’t conscious of creating any particular narrative or story, but I wanted each piece to flow on from the previous one in a way that made sense musically. A lot of the music I’m fond of is very minimal or subtle, or has its own ascent and descent, beginning and ending on a pensive, thoughtful note. I tried to work up to a peak point around the three-quarter mark with some faster-paced music, such as Hans Zimmer and Clint Mansell, who both combine electronic elements with classical instruments really effectively. I then wanted to come down from the extreme tension in ‘Summer Overture’ and release some emotion with ‘Locke’d Out Again’ (anyone who is a Lost fan will understand just how heart-wrenching that track really is!). Then ‘Finale’ works up again but in the last 30 seconds or so just releases all that tension and finishes with that beautiful Vaughan Williams-like theme that we heard earlier in ‘Balloon Music’.

It wasn’t as hard as I expected finding places for my pieces in the tracklist. ‘A Call to Open Spaces’ worked well in between ‘Cathedral’ and ‘Angels in America’ as they all have religious themes in their composition or context of the films/scenes they’re from. I placed ‘Submergence’ following ‘The Cannery’ because there is a strong water theme running through the ‘In The Bedroom’ soundtrack and I felt they fit well together. Finally I put ‘On the Shore’ as the penultimate piece because it’s very meditative and pensive – working really well before the last bit of excitement in ‘Finale’.